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2018 – 03/02 – How to classify shareholder advances

Classifying shareholder advances is one of the gray areas in financial reporting. When deciding whether to report advances as debt or equity, ask yourself the following questions: Does management intend to repay the loan? Can the company realistically repay it? Have market-rate terms been negotiated and followed? And how is the transaction classified for tax purposes? Shareholder advances present financial reporting challenges. We can help you address those challenges and adequately disclose these transactions in your financial statement footnotes.

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2018 – 03/12 – Make sure repairs to tangible property were actually repairs before you deduct the cost

Repairs businesses made to tangible property (such as buildings, machinery, equipment or vehicles) last year generally can be immediately expensed and fully deducted on 2017 income tax returns. But costs incurred last year to improve such property must be depreciated over a period of years, providing a much smaller 2017 deduction. Distinguishing between repairs and improvements can be difficult. Fortunately, some IRS safe harbors can help. To learn about the safe harbors and other ways to maximize your tangible property deductions, contact us.

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2018 – 03/05 – Don’t forget: 2017 tax filing deadline for pass-through entities is March 15

The federal income tax filing deadline for calendar-year partnerships, S corporations and LLCs treated as partnerships or S corporations for tax purposes is March 15, about a month earlier than the deadline for personal returns. If you haven’t filed your partnership or S corporation return yet, you may be thinking about an extension. An extension can be tax-smart if you’re missing critical documents or an unexpected life event is preventing you from devoting sufficient time to your return now. But there are additional considerations. Contact us to learn more.

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2018 – 03/09 – Feeling lucky? How to find a pot of gold in your financials

Every business experiences occasional cash shortages. But, if you’re lucky, you may find a hidden pot of gold in your balance sheet using the cash gap. This metric is a function of the timing difference between when companies order materials and pay suppliers and when they receive payment from their customers. By focusing on three balance sheet accounts (inventory, receivables and payables) you can generate extra cash and lower financing costs. Contact us for help calculating your company’s cash gap and using it to manage working capital more efficiently.

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2018 – 03/06 – Size of charitable deductions depends on many factors

Whether you’re claiming charitable deductions on your 2017 return or planning your donations for 2018, be sure you know how much you’re allowed to deduct. Your deduction depends on not only the amount you give, but also what you give (for example, cash, property or services), whether your total donations for the year exceed certain income-based limits, whether you receive a benefit from the charity, and even how the charity uses the gift. Other rules and limits also apply, and the TCJA could affect your deductions for your 2018 donations. Contact us to learn more.

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2018 – 03/05 – Don’t forget: 2017 tax filing deadline for pass-through entities is March 15

The federal income tax filing deadline for calendar-year partnerships, S corporations and LLCs treated as partnerships or S corporations for tax purposes is March 15, about a month earlier than the deadline for personal returns. If you haven’t filed your partnership or S corporation return yet, you may be thinking about an extension. An extension can be tax-smart if you’re missing critical documents or an unexpected life event is preventing you from devoting sufficient time to your return now. But there are additional considerations. Contact us to learn more.

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2018 – 03/02 – How to classify shareholder advances

Classifying shareholder advances is one of the gray areas in financial reporting. When deciding whether to report advances as debt or equity, ask yourself the following questions: Does management intend to repay the loan? Can the company realistically repay it? Have market-rate terms been negotiated and followed? And how is the transaction classified for tax purposes? Shareholder advances present financial reporting challenges. We can help you address those challenges and adequately disclose these transactions in your financial statement footnotes.

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